Ruth Speaks Out

This blog is maintained by the Ruth Institute. It provides a place for our Circle of Experts to express themselves. This is where the scholars, experts, students and followers of the Ruth Institute engage in constructive dialogue about the issues surrounding the Sexual Revolution. We discuss public policy, social practices, legal doctrines and much more.


Statement of the Ruth Institute on the Department of Justice Guidelines to Ensure the Civil Rights of Transgender Students

Prepared by Dr. Jennifer Roback Morse, Founder and President, The Ruth Institute
July 2016
 
The Ruth Institute objects to these far-reaching Guidelines of questionable legality. Among our chief concerns:
  • These Guidelines, if implemented, will not actually help real children, struggling with unique and complex issues, such as Intersex students and students who experience Gender Dysphoria. (See the complete analysis below.)
  • The Guidelines permit students to present themselves as “transgender,” without the knowledge of their parents and without any adult input at all.
  • The Guidelines create a class of students called “Transgender” which is a politically defined and not a medically defined class. The government has no competency to do such a thing.
  • These Guidelines, if implemented, will certainly harm the millions of ordinary children who are not struggling with gender identity issues at this time.
  • These far-reaching Guidelines from the Federal government encroach on the legitimate prerogatives of states, localities and families.
  • These Guidelines were issued through a “Dear Colleague” letter, which may or may not be legally binding. Indeed, the 23 states that are suing the Department of Justice argue that such a letter is not binding on local schools.
  • School boards are well within their moral and legal rights to decline to participate in the federal government’s war against nature.
 
We offer our reasons for believing these Guidelines do not serve the interests of the children of the United States.

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